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October 21, 2022 4 min read

Poor Gut Health Related To Leaky Gut, IBS, and Intestinal Cancers

Gut health is a growing area of research as we discover more about the role our gut plays in our physical and mental well-being. The microbiome or microbiota — meaning the microorganisms that live on and in us, play an integral role in our gut health. These microorganisms help digest food, produce vitamins, and fight off pathogenic bacteria.

This healthy article explores the link between gut health, related to brain problems, as well as leaky gut syndrome, cancer, irritable bowel syndrome IBS, Crohn’s disease, chronic stress, depression and anxiety.

 

What Is Leaky Gut?

Leaky Gut occurs when the intestinal wall becomes more permeable, allowing toxins, pathogens, and undigested food particles to enter the bloodstream. This is likely due to damage caused by poor diet, stress, infection and other factors. This increased intestinal permeability is similar to a porous fence, where unwanted substances start to seep through. People with digestive issues including IBS, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Celiac and other food intolerances, autoimmune diseases, and mental health problems may have a “leaky gut”.

Currently, there is no medical diagnostic test for leaky gut, so many health professionals don’t usually refer to leaky gut as a problematic factor. Medically speaking – there is no cure for it either, but there are steps you can take to improve your health and reduce the risk of complications.

 

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

People with IBS often have intestinal dysbiosis (imbalance of gut microbiota), which can lead to leaky gut. Although IBS is a complex condition, many people also find that their symptoms improve on a gluten-free diet due to the fact that gluten can cause intestinal inflammation and increase intestinal permeability, which may lead to development of IBS, as well as other health issues.

 

Crohn's disease

People living with Crohn’s disease (also known as “regional ileitis” in the small intestine, “inflammatory bowel disease” in the colon, or colitis) have an increased risk of developing leaky gut. Studies show that the immune system plays an important role in the development of symptoms, with 60-80% of patients having an abnormal immune response. The microbes in the gut seem to play an important role in this response, with some researchers suggesting that gut dysbiosis (imbalance of gut microbiota) is linked to an overactive immune response in people with Crohn’s disease.

 

Cancer

A connection between gut health and the development of cancer has been explored by many researchers, who have found that people with gastrointestinal cancers often have intestinal dysbiosis (imbalance of gut microbiota). The connection between the two is complex, but one theory is that intestinal dysbiosis may lead to an increase in toxins in the bloodstream, which may cause DNA mutations. It’s important to note that not all people with intestinal dysbiosis go on to develop cancer.

 

Chronic stress and depression

Stress is one of the most commonly cited factors in the development of leaky gut and a wide range of health issues. A number of studies have shown that stress induces changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, and impairs intestinal barrier function leading to “leaky gut syndrome”. Stress also has a significant impact on our mental health, with chronic stress being associated with a range of mental health issues including depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

It is thought that many of the physical symptoms of stress such as fatigue, headaches, and muscle pain are caused by the release of chemicals such as adrenaline and cortisol. People with a strong tendency towards chronic stress should take steps to reduce levels of these chemicals in their bodies, which will lead to better mental health outcomes.

 

Helpful Insights

Gut health is a growing area of research as we discover more about the role our gut plays in our physical and mental well-being. The microbiome or microbiota — meaning the microorganisms that live on and in us — plays an important role in our gut health, as these organisms help digest food, produce vitamins, and fight off pathogenic bacteria. When the balance of these organisms is disrupted, it can lead to intestinal dysbiosis (also known as “leaky gut”). It’s important to keep your gut healthy, as a dysfunctional gut can lead to a wide range of health problems, including digestive issues, autoimmune diseases, mental health issues, and cancer.

Several things to consider for improving your gut health:

1) Remove all processed foods from your diet

2) Replace processed foods with natural foods that are grown in a garden

3) Replace gluten with gluten-free options 

4) Reduce stress and focus on lowering your anxiety

5) Start a detox

6) Stop buying conventional foods, genetically modified or GM foods, and instead buy organic if possible

7) Consider getting a no EMF sauna for general well-being

8) Meditation – We recommend the bible (consider Psalms and Proverbs)

 

Information Disclaimer: The following statements are for educational purposes only and have not been evaluated by the FDA. We encourage you to speak with your preferred medical advisor to determine if this information is right for you. This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

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